explore ATX: Bouldin Creek Cafe

Bouldin Creek Cafe is probably my new favorite restaurant in Austin. I briefly mentioned it in one of my other Explore Austin posts, but I feel like I should do a separate post just on this cafe to do it justice.

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Sweet Tooth: Tian Jiu (Sweet Rice Wine)

Tian Jiu, otherwise known as fermented cooked rice, is a popular southeast Asian tradition, as it has many uses in addition to being a great-tasting rice pudding. Many people will eat it in the winter as a way to keep warm, and mothers who have just given birth will also eat it, as it’s said to be good for the body as it recuperates. (And apparently it’s good to use as a face mask!)

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Wanderlust: Guangzhou’s dim-sun, desserts & more (part four)

And finally, here’s the last post in the Guangzhou/Xiamen series (that, honestly, I should have posted a loooong time ago, but got caught up in some other things…) Anyways, on the rest of the post:

Dim sum is a style of Chinese cuisine prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates and is popular particularly in Guangdong. Dim sum dishes are usually served with tea, and together form a full tea brunch, although nowadays it really doesn’t matter what time of the day you crave dim-sun; you’ll always be able to get some.

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Wanderlust: Guangzhou, the food city of China (part three)

I spent about a week in Guangzhou, China, last month (which you can read all about here and here). Guangzhou is the third largest city in China, but I daresay the food there is best in the nation. There’s a popular Chinese saying — 食在广州, which literally translates to eat in Guangzhou — that best testifies to the idea that the food scene in Guangzhou is spectacular.

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Wanderlust: Gulangyu (Xiamen), the piano island (part two)

Just off the coast of Xiamen is Gulangyu, a pedestrian-only island that is also a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site. At only 2 km2 area and home to about 20,000 people, Gulangyu is a major domestic tourist destination and is one of China’s most visited tourist attractions. However, all cars and bicycles are banned on the island, which helps to preserve an air of antiquity and tranquility.

Shuzhuang Garden

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Wanderlust: Xiamen, the gateway to China (part one)

After spending almost four days in Guangzhou, we took a high speed train to Xiamen. Xiamen, located in Fujian Province, is a coastal city, and as such, has been an extremely important port in China for centuries, as well as one of China’s earliest Special Economic Zones. Translated directly, Xiamen means “door to the house”, referring to the city’s centuries-old role as a gateway to China.

Yongding District of Longyan

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Finding My Identity: Q&A with Namitha (TeenMemoir)

Recently, Namitha from TeenMemoir and I collaborated on a Q&A-style post about identity, particularly for those who are second-generation kids growing up in a different country than their parents are from, or kids who are growing up in a different country than the one they were born in. Our ethnicities, heritage, and the respective cultures of our native country and that of our parents heavily shape who we are, and when we grow up surrounded by different cultures, it does get pretty confusing for a young child trying to figure out who they are. Namitha and I each wrote five questions for the other, so below are my questions and her answers. Check out her blog post for my half of the Q&A!

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